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2003 Private Sector Program Annual Meeting Abstracts


WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS

Data Mining Concepts and Techniques
Michael Welge, Loretta Auvil, Automated Learning Group
Monday, April 28, 8:30 am

This workshop will describe concepts and techniques for effective analytical data mining. We will discuss data mining methods for prediction, discovery, deviation detection and information visualization techniques. The goal is to provide an understanding of the knowledge discovery process and data mining paradigms, along with the role of data mining frameworks, like D2K.

 

 

Transitioning from the Origin2000 to the IBM 690 Regattas
Ian Brooks
Monday, April 28, 10:30 am

This talk will provide the information necessary for users of the SGI Origin2000 to transition to the new IBM p690. It will include information on the p690 hardware and cover the differences in compilers, libraries, and batch system.

 

 

Data Mining Frameworks - D2K and D2K Streamline
Michael Welge, Loretta Auvil, Automated Learning Group
Monday, April 28, 10:30 am

This workshop will focus on how D2K can be used as a rapid and flexible data mining and machine learning system. We will also be introducing D2K Streamline (SL), our latest software development effort. D2K SL does not expose the full complexity of the D2K Toolkit, but instead presents the user with pre-configured options corresponding to the steps along the knowledge discovery process. We will focus on how specialized applications can be packaged and presented to user communities via Streamline. Our intention is that D2K SL will become a mechanism for easy technology transfer to NCSA partners and collaborators.

 

 

Data Mining Applications Using D2K
Michael Welge, Duane Searsmith, Alan Craig, Peter Bajcsy, David Tcheng, Automated Learning Group
Dan Kauwell, Beckman Institute/NCSA
Monday, April 28, 1:00 pm

This workshop will focus on two areas of research—text mining, image mining, and multi-layered learning strategies. The new text mining tool, REVEAL, will be described and demonstrated and the latest ALG developments in image mining will also be overviewed. Then we will describe techniques for multi-layered learning.

 

 

Performance of Various Codes on the New NCSA Computing Resources
Bruce Loftis, Associate Director, Applications Technology Division
Seid Koric, Engineering Applications Analyst
Wai Yip Kwok, Research Programmer, Scientific Computing Division
Dodi Heryadi, Research Scientist, Computational Chemistry and Biology Group
Monday, April 28, 1:00 pm

NCSA technical staff members will present benchmark performance for the new NCSA clusters and shared-memory computers. The emphasis will be commercial codes in the general fields of Computational Chemistry and Biology, Computational Structural Mechanics, and Computational Fluid Mechanics.

 

 



TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATIONS

Database Data Mining with D2K
Dora Cai, Research Programmer, Automated Learning Group
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 3269, Beckman Institute

This demonstration will show how D2K is utilized to perform data mining tasks from a database perspective. We will show current ALG research into data mining techniques for finding patterns in crime data using databases.

 

 

HyperComputiCations
Gerry Labedz, Fellow of the Technical Staff, Dan Noble Fellow, Motorola, Inc.
Michael Welge, Director, Automated Learning Group
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 4269, Beckman Institute

"HyperComputiCations" means "HYPERfast COMPUTational communICATIONS." In this system communications functions are carried over a hyperfast network and assisted, probably remotely, by computational facilities. This prototype uses the outputs of a knowledge discovery application (D2K) as content to be delivered. We will demonstrate a system that enables collaborators in multiple cities to create and discuss the results of a D2K activity in real time. This project was led by Motorola Laboratories.

 

 

REVEAL (Research Engine to Visualize, Evaluate, Archive, and Learn)
Duane Searsmith, Senior Research Programmer, Automated Learning Group
Alan Craig, Research Programmer, Visualization & Virtual Environments
Dan Kauwell, Beckman Institute/NCSA
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 4269, Beckman Institute

This demo will show the REVEAL system, a merging of three technologies—T2K, VIAS, and VisIT. REVEAL collects data by interfacing to any accessible document source such as a Web crawler or news group (and mail list) readers. The REVEAL archival engine normalizes the data and extracts important information for fast recall. It then stores the data in a customized high-performance distributed database. Users perform queries, manage data sources (i.e. direct Web crawlers) and build search spaces that are persistent and sharable. Search spaces serve as containers for the user's work product and are a fundamental unit of reuse and collaboration. A number of advanced text analysis tools are built into REVEAL including document classification, information extraction, and real-time clustering of very large document sets. A rich set of visualizations support the analysis task. REVEAL also learns from user interactions and uses this information to enhance performance.

 

 

GIS to Knowledge (GIS2K)
Peter Bajcsy, Research Scientist, Automated Learning Group
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 3269, Beckman Institute

This demo will show a System for Territorial Partitioning of GIS Raster and Vector Data. We will demonstrate an overview of territory analysis at multiple geographic boundary specifications based on U.S. Census Bureau boundaries, terrain elevation, forest data, and crime data.

 

 

Microarray to Knowledge
Greg Pape, Research Programmer, Automated Learning Group
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 3269, Beckman Institute

This demo will show a D2K-Driven application that performs analysis of microarray laser scans. This tool performs grid alignment, quality assurance, feature extraction, and feature clustering of microarray images. Microarray technology has been used for drug design and testing. The goal is to provide a high throughput inspection tool for data that is exponentially growing.

 

 

D2K Streamline™ (D2K SL)
David Clutter, Research Programmer, Automated Learning Group
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 3269, Beckman Institute

D2K Streamline™ is a new software effort that does not expose the full complexity of the D2K Toolkit but instead presents the user with pre-configured options corresponding to the steps along the knowledge discovery process. This workshop will focus on how specialized applications can be packaged up and presented to user communities via D2K SL. Our intention is that SL will become a mechanism for easy technology transfer to NCSA partners and collaborators.

 

 

Information Visualization—MAE Center
Chris Navarro, Research Programmer, Automated Learning Group
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 4269, Beckman Institute

This demo will show our latest work in information visualization for the Mid America Earthquake (MAE) Center. It shows how D2K is used as a framework for integration of several research efforts.

 

 

The NCSA Knowledge Center
Tim Wentling, Sr. Research Scientist, Knowledge Systems Learning Group
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 1005, Beckman Institute

This demonstration will highlight the major features of the Knowledge Center designed by the Knowledge and Learning Systems Group at NCSA. The knowledge center consists of four tightly integrated components that include the; 1) Knowledge Base—a database repository, that provides storage for learning objects while it continuously crawls the Internet in search of domain-specific knowledge, 2) e-Learning System—a pedagogically sound e-Learning delivery system tailored for maximum flexibility and user-friendliness, 3) Collaboration Space—a sophisticated communication/collaboration system that includes tools ranging from text chat and e-mail to multi-point video with application sharing, and 4) Knowledge Exchange—an expert exchange to assist users in posing questions to peers and in locating experts and posing questions to them.

 

 

The Alliance Science Portal
Jay Alameda, Research Programmer, Application Technologies
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 1005 Beckman Institute

The Alliance Science Portal is designed to meet the needs of a few large classes of applications. The first class of applications is that of multi-scale, multi-phenomena science, in which the phenomena being examined are modeled in multiple codes and full consideration of the problem requires combinations of the multiple codes, as each of the codes do not handle the full range of phenomena being examined. Examples of this application include copper electrodeposition to form microprocessor conductors, crevice corrosion, and flow through porous media in petroleum reservoirs. The second class of applications are designed to shed light on the value and/or sensitivity of key physical parameters, which would both contribute to the understanding of the phenomena being studied as well as provide guidance for efforts to further refine estimates of the parameters. Examples of this application are quite numerous, as it is not uncommon to have parameters in physical models which are not well characterized; in this case we will consider studies of parameter spaces for copper electrodeposition as well as for severe storm simulation. Despite being designed for these classes of applications, the Alliance Science Portal is also capable of handling any number of traditional supercomputing jobs which have a workflow consisting of the basic steps of a) stage input files from permanent file store, b) execute scientific code or codes and c) store results back to permanent file store.

In order to support the needs of these driving applications, we are developing infrastructure, using standard grid middleware as our foundation. Simply, our infrastructure consists of a grid and grid Web service client, for the user, and an application manager Web service, which executes the series of scientific codes on the computational grid. We also have a number of support services, including a Web service registry, a project repository, an event system and so on.

 

 

The National Virtual Observatory on the Grid
Ray Plante, Research Scientist, Application Technology
Robert Brunner, Research Scientist, Application Technology; Assistant Professor of Astronomy
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 1005 Beckman Institute

The National Virtual Observatory is funded by the NSF to build a Data Grid for astronomy. It is aimed at laying down basic infrastructure that allows scientists integrate diverse data from public archives with distributed computing. As a major partner in this effort, NCSA is active in the development of metadata standards, grid management tools, and data mining. In addition, NCSA serves as a major provider of data from various optical and radio telescopes. In this presentation, we demonstrate an early prototype of grid-based service that integrates multifrequency data with distributed computational analysis. We also preview some of the data-mining that can be done on large, multifrequency datasets.

 

 

Smart Room Technologies
Donna Cox and team, Experimental Technologies
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm

Intellibadge™
A specialized IntelliBadge demonstration where we would distribute on-line smart tags to attendees and they would carry the tags during the Monday night and Wednesday night receptions. During their movement through the 3rd floor demonstrations, some of the displays would respond to attendees with a Responsive Global Map that displays their names and institutions as the approach. Note: As attendees depart the reception, badges may be dropped off at the reception registration desk
 
Streaming High
We have HD streaming mpeg Science Bulletins that are High-Definition digital live-actions narratives and visualization productions from the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. AMNH sends the playlists over Internet2 to an Advanced Computations Building server at NCSA, where we distribute the content to subscribing museums around the United States. The productions are high-quality science narratives on "Astronomy Bulletins," "Earth Bulletins," and "Biology Bulletins" and they look fantastic on the HD theatre!
 
High Definition Edit
We will have the new High-Definition Edit Suite set up for control and playback of digital content in the Suite as well as control of the HD Theatre Display via the control center editor.
 
Wearable Computer
We are working with Senior Design students on a project where biosensors control music and visuals in a wearable computer. Breath and heartbeat selects the type of music or visuals to see. If the students are far enough along, we may have some interesting demonstrations with the technology.
 
Smart Plants
The plants in the NL will have sensors that will email or tell humans when to water them.

 

 

Using Animation to Visualize Network Traffic Patterns and Security Events
Mike Haberman, Senior Research Engineer, Network Research
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 1005, Beckman Institute

The NCSA Security and Network Research Groups have developed a tool that animates network usage patterns. Temporal network behavior patterns of computers can easily be seen when viewed via time-lapsed animations. Security events such as ping sweeps, DoS attacks, and port scans can be detected even if the attack is distributed or occurs over a long period of time. This tool is being used for situational awareness of network events over a specific time period and for comparing sampled traffic models with actual traffic measurements.

 

 

CAVE Demonstrations
William Sherman, Senior Research Programmer, Visualization and Virtual Environments
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 3510, Beckman Institute

At the NCSA CAVE, we will be demonstrating our latest virtual reality applications, displayed on our new projectors with increased resolution and clarity. The NCSA virtual reality applications have been developed through collaborations with industry, local research scientists, NCSA Faculty Fellows, University of Illinois students, and VR programmers from around the Alliance. Visitors to the CAVE will have the opportunity to see our newest work, or some old classics that may be new to them.

 

 

Tiled Display Wall Demo
Paul Rajlich, Research Programmer, Visualization and Virtual Environments
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 3514, Beckman Institute

The NCSA Visualization and Virtual Environments group will be demonstrating its scalable tiled display wall, one of the highest resolution displays in existence. The current configuration is a 40-projector system driven by a cluster of 40 PCs, resulting in one logical display with a resolution of 8,192 x 3,840 pixels. This work represents NCSA's contribution to the scalable tiled display wall community and is being documented as part of the Alliance Wall-in-a-box initiative. The applications that will be shown include high-resolution movie playback, large image exploration, and interactive 3D visualization.

 

 

Cluster Monitor Software—CluMon
Joshi Fullop, Systems Engineer, Systems Group
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 1005, Beckman Institute

NCSA's CluMon is a scalable, tunable, and intuitive package directed at monitoring large groups of Linux-based machines. It is currently the only cluster monitoring solution that correlates scheduling, job and queue data with the plethora of machine metrics such as load, memory usage, drive space, etc. All of this is rolled up into an easy-to-use and administer Web interface. CluMon is currently moving to allow plug-ins and the ability to facilitate scripts to provide a total cluster management solution. Other features include an alert system, problem tracking system, job history archive, admin and user portals; as well as the ability to act as a Web-services information provider. This and much more is available from this open source project.

 

 

Data Mining for Determinants of Infectious Disease Suspectibility
Lawrence Schook, Faculty Excellence Professor of Comparative Genomics; Program Director, Agricultural Genome Sciences and Public Policy Training Program
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Room 3269, Beckman Institute

The genetic basis for inter- and intra-species variation to the susceptibility to infectious agents has been observed for leprosy, tuberculosis, HIV, malaria and hepatitis B persistence. Defining the genetic elements that contribute to susceptibility have proven difficult to define using traditional approaches such as population associations, artificial challenge studies and in defining the threshold phenotype in various environments. Analysis of the susceptibility to infectious diseases has been described as potentially the most complex area of genetics for complex traits. We are developing an integrated database associated with human and animal genome projects as well as clinical and pathology databases. The NCSA data mining approaches will permit us to develop models for future experimental validation with respect to the genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases. Our first application of data mining is to analyze micro-array data involving about 13k gene expression levels. D2K is used to build static models predicting gene expression levels based on other genes expression levels. We will then use genetic programming and other methods to construct dynamic models of gene activity represented as a network of biochemical pathways. Text analysis tools will be used to generate knowledge bases from electronic published research papers. We will use predictive (hold out) accuracy as a guiding force for optimally integrating available data and knowledge bases into the system. This derived information relating genes will permit studies into novel therapeutics, monitoring protocols for infectious agents, and increased insights into infectious diseases. We plan to provide support for the development of a tutorial in data mining for life scientists working in genomics and health.

 

 

Tours of Linux Computing Environment (optional)
Brian Kucic, Senior Operations Manager, Computing Operations
Monday, April 28, 6:30 pm
Advanced Computations Building

The tour features:

  • World Class Computational/Operations Facility
  • IA-32, IA-64, and McKinley Linux Clusters
  • IBM P690 Regatta
  • ADIC Tape Robot
  • Meet at registration table 10 minutes prior to departure time:

    • First bus leaving Beckman at 6:30 pm and returning at 7:15 pm
    • Second bus leaving Beckman at 7:30 pm and returning at 8:15 pm

     

     

    File Systems Over Long Distances
    Michelle Butler, Technical Program Manager, Storage Enabling Technologies Group
    Monday, April 28, 6:30 p.m.
    Room 1005, Beckman Institute

    File systems over distance is not easy. The file reads and writes must be put over the internet somehow. There are many ways to move entire files between sites, ftp comes to mind. NCSA and ANL are testing reading and writing to disks by an application, and the application not knowing that the disks are far away or close for that matter. The network latency is what file systems today can not tolerate, or that the disks don't respond immediately when a read/write has been requested. NCSA has been testing with Argonne National Lab a hardware solution from LightSand that allows hosts at either site to read and write to disks at the other site at normal fiberchannel speeds of 90MB/s. The LightSand hardware box sends the fiberchannel commands over a SONNET network. This demo will be showing systems at Argonne and NCSA reading and writing disks at each other sites over the SONNET layer of network, and showing speeds.

     

     



    TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PRESENTATIONS

    A Large SAN from Design to Production
    Michelle Butler, Technical Program Manager, Storage Enabling Technologies Group
    Tuesday, April 29, 2:00 pm
    Holiday Inn Salons D, E, & F

    NCSA has built a 60TB SAN using Brocade switches with 256 ports of SAN fabric filled with hosts and 88TB of storage. This talk will be about what we are currently doing, and how we got to this point, and what we have learned. NCSA also has another fabric for the TeraGrid which is 512 ports of SAN for 268 hosts and 230TB of storage. The TeraGrid fabric/implementation will also be discussed.

     

     

    Smart Tracking Technologies for Industrial Applications
    Donna Cox, Senior Research Scientist, Experimental Technologies
    Tuesday, April 29, 3:00 pm
    Holiday Inn Salons D, E, & F

     

     

    NCSA Security Program
    Randy Butler, Senior Associate Director, Networking, Security, and Middleware Directorate
    Wednesday, April 30, 8:00 am
    Holiday Inn Salons D, E, & F

     

     

    Technology to Support Communities of Practice: The NCSA Knowledge Center
    Tim Wentling, Sr. Research Scientist, Knowledge Systems Learning Group
    Wednesday, April 30, 8:30 am
    Holiday Inn Salons D, E, & F

    The presentation will describe the newly-developed Knowledge Center and its core components: a Knowledge Base, an e-Learning System, a Collaboration Space, and the Knowledge Exchange.

     

     

    Discus: Distributed Innovation and Scalable Collaboration in Uncertain Settings
    Michael Welge, David Goldberg, Automated Learning Group
    Wednesday, April 30, 9:00 am
    Holiday Inn Salons D, E, & F

    This presentation will describe Knowledge Fusion, and Innovation via Data Mining, Chance Discovery, and Human and Machine Based Genetic Algorithms.

     

     

    GIS to Knowledge (GIS2K)
    Peter Bajcsy, Research Scientist, Automated Learning Group
    Wednesday, April 30, 9:30 am
    Holiday Inn Salons D, E, & F

    This presentation will describe a data mining system for territorial partitioning of GIS Raster and Vector Data. We will present an overview of territory analysis at multiple geographic boundary specifications based on U.S. Census Bureau boundaries, terrain elevation, forest data, and crime data.

     

     

    Tour of Knowledge & Learning Systems Group Research Lab
    Tim Wentling, Sr. Research Scientist, Knowledge Systems Learning Group
    Tuesday, April 28, 5:00 pm
    Room E223, UIUC South Research Park

    This demonstration will highlight the major features of the Knowledge Center designed by the Knowledge and Learning Systems Group at NCSA. The knowledge center consists of four tightly integrated components that include the; 1) Knowledge Base—a database repository, that provides storage for learning objects while it continuously crawls the Internet in search of domain-specific knowledge, 2) e-Learning System—a pedagogically sound e-Learning delivery system tailored for maximum flexibility and user-friendliness, 3) Collaboration Space—a sophisticated communication/collaboration system that includes tools ranging from text chat and e-mail to multi-point video with application sharing, and 4) Knowledge Exchange—an expert exchange to assist users in posing questions to peers and in locating experts and posing questions to them.

     

     

    Access Grid Technologies
    Tom Coffin, Alliance Liaison for Virtual Environments and the ACCESS Technical Coordinator
    Tuesday, April 28, 5:00 pm
    Ground Floor Conference Room, UIUC South Research Park

    The Access Grid is the ensemble of resources that can be used to support human interaction across the grid (the grid refers to high speed networks using internet protocols). It consists of multimedia display, presentation and interactive environments, interfaces to grid middleware, interfaces to visualization environments. The Access Grid will support large-scale distributed meetings, collaborative work sessions, seminars, lectures, tutorials and training. The Access Grid design point is group-to-group communication. The Access Grid environment must enable both formal and informal group interactions. Large-format displays integrated with intelligent or active meeting rooms are a central feature of the Access Grid nodes. Access Grid nodes are "designed spaces" that explicitly contain the high-end audio and visual technology needed to provide a high-quality compelling user experience. The Access Grid addresses the need for persistent electronic spaces. We believe persistence is necessary to build true electronic communities, create lasting maps of the real world to distributed virtual environments, and enable experimentation with new modes of collaboration.

    The Access Grid has evolved from an academic experiment to a commercialized product. In it's commercialization the concepts involved with the grid have been coupled with a professional support infrastructure. InSORS is the name of the company, which has commercialized this technology. With commercialization the Access Grid has also become scalable in the sense that it can accommodate both a multimedia conferencing environment and desktop-to-desktop. InSORS is a Chicago based company but they have demonstration sites in many cities across the globe.

    In the academic environment the Access Grid is evolving from AG1.x to AG2.0. Still in it's Beta form, AG2.0 will be a much richer collaborative environment (though it is not backward compatible) which allows researchers to share data and other resources over the Grid. AG2.0 is used in combination with Globus a middleware developed for grid computing.

     

     

    Web Frameworks for Business Systems
    Douglas Fein, Technical Project Lead
    Tuesday, April 28, 5:00 pm
    E242 UIUC South Research Park

    Using technologies created over the past years, and new APIs being built everyday, we are expanding the power of the Web for business applications. Using new techniques, which combine with SAP, Lotus, and Palmtree systems, we are creating a stronger system for easy creation of business applications. The new Web framework being created is made for quick easy data-driven solutions. You can connect multiple existing data structures, and create new structures using the RAD development tools. With further work this system can provide knowledge databases, and connections to much existing knowledge within a company. In addition, we are incorporating other technologies, including conferencing, and file sharing.

    The framework is being built to support NCSA activities, but has been planned in such a way that it can be expanded to support applications from many different sectors. In the near future, the system will be available to help partners work with NCSA and NCSA systems. After the initial release we hope to expand the system to something useful in industry as a bridge between larger systems, and as a window into disconnected systems. This will include technologies from the OPIE project, as well as some newer technologies.

    Web Services are the future of business system integration. As they become more common we will see more and more services moving to a Web environment. This Web framework is geared towards working with existing systems to expand the processes and data interaction for users. Our main goal is to create a system that supports quick easy creation of new applications for short-term projects. Web services are the perfect answer for these projects, and can assist in saving time and money when larger endeavors are not needed.

     

     

    Security Monitoring through Visualization
    Bill Yurcik
    Wednesday, April 30, 10:30 am
    Holiday Inn Salons D, E, & F

    The critical role of the human operator has not been the focus of existing security monitoring tools. We have developed a prototype visual security monitoring tool that leverages human cognitive processing with interactive data mining capabilities. The research breakthrough is a human "situational awareness" of events on large and complex computer networks highlighting relationships between macro/micro security events and dynamic security events over time.

     

     

    Gaining Insight to Network Utilization through Traffic Animation
    Mike Haberman, Senior Research Engineer, Network Research
    Wednesday, April 30, 10:30 am
    Holiday Inn Salons D, E, & F

    The Network Research Group at NCSA developed a simple tool that animates network usage patterns. Network behavior patterns of hosts can easily be seen when viewed via time-lapsed animations. Our goal with this tool is to be able to view how closely sampled network traffic models resemble the actual traffic patterns. It is our hope that scalable applications can be built that can reliably use sampled date to make projections, estimations, and inferences.

     

     

    The Grid for Real: Mirage II at TRECC, Motorola and NCSA
    Gerry Labedz, Fellow of the Technical Staff, Dan Noble Fellow, Motorola, Inc.
    Wednesday, April 30, 10:30 am

    The goal of the Mirage II project is to create a working demonstration of a real Hyper Computi Cations application. This is Motorola's term for "HyperFast Computational Communications". The project has been done is association with the Automated Learning Group at NCSA.

    MIRAGE II delivers an Augmented Reality (AR) view of the graphical output of a knowledge discovery process (D2K) to multiple users in multiple cities. The idea is to demonstrate a collaborative capability where the bulk of the computing for both the D2K and Augmented Reality functions are at locations removed from the users. In other words, the user facilities are "asset light" requiring only the human interfaces and a network connection. The network connection taps the users into The Grid, where both the knowledge discovery and human interface (AR) computations are performed in real time. The user needs to support no computational facilities. Since the human interface is AR, screens and projectors are also unnecessary and the local conference room can be any room with a network connection and some place to tape a piece of paper for the AR target to a wall (or even a ceiling!)

    In the MIRAGE II prototype the viewers can be in Champaign-Urbana, in the Motorola facility in Schaumburg, Illinois, at the TRECC center at the DuPage County Airport all at the same time, engaging in a collaborative exchange while viewing the resultant data.

     

     

     

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