2010 NCSA Private Sector Program Annual Meeting

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2010 NCSA Private Sector Program Annual Meeting

Speaker bios

Galen Arnold is a system engineer at NCSA. He has worked in the systems, consulting, and training groups and does consulting and training for internal staff and external users. He completed a BS in math at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1987 and has been using Unix systems since 1985.

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Richard Arthur is the manager of the Advanced Computing Laboratory at GE Global Research. As GE Research supports the broad range of GE's technology needs from healthcare to energy to financial services to aircraft engines, the Advanced Computing Lab supports a wide variety of scientific fields and applications in employing computing and software technologies toward competitive advantage. The lab adopts emerging technologies in embedded and high-performance computing for medical imaging, national security, massive data analysis, and the design of complex machinery and materials. Rick started with GE in 1990, initially developing military planning software for DARPA. He has a BS from Clarkson University, a master's from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and an MBA from the University at Albany. He serves on several advisory councils to professional societies and industrial partners and is a member of ACM and Tau Beta Pi.

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Gregory Bauer earned his PhD in physics from the University of Oregon in 1996. He has been providing early machine evaluation, application performance analysis, and mathematical library support at NCSA since 2001. He has been an instructor in Linux Cluster Institutes and a presenter at TeraGrid, NCSA PSP, and BlueWaters workshops.

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Brett M. Bode is Blue Waters software development manager at NCSA. He is responsible for managing the software development projects at NCSA and partner organizations that are focused on improving the quality and capability of the software that will be deployed on the Blue Waters system. Brett holds a BS in chemistry and physics from Illinois State University and a PhD in physical chemistry from Iowa State University. His research interests span a range of issues from the management and optimization of HPC resources to application development efforts. He is a contributor to the GAMESS quantum chemistry package and is the lead developer for the MacMolPlt graphical user interface to GAMESS.

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Robert A. Fiedler leads a team of advanced user-support specialists and computational scientists who are working with the developers of a broad range of applications selected by the National Science Foundation to prepare their codes for Blue Waters by the time it goes into production, and to assist them in using the system for scientific discovery. Fiedler previously served 10 years as the technical program manager at the (DOE/NNSA ASC Level 1) Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets, leading a multidisciplinary team developing a large-scale fully-coupled multiphysics rocket simulation package "Rocstar." Rocstar has been used to simulate next-generation versions of the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor, providing NASA rocket designers with detailed solutions based on first principles that they could use to validate their simpler engineering models. He has also served as a senior technical consultant with Hewlett Packard Co., supporting systems at the U.S. Naval Research Lab, and held prior positions at NCSA as a postdoc and later as a senior research programmer, supporting and developing the ZEUS-MP astrophysics code.

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Paul Fussell is a senior manager with the Boeing Research and Technology organization. Paul earned his PhD in mechanical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in 1994. He now leads a team focused on mathematical modeling in the Applied Mathematics group, primarily based in Seattle. Paul's team has several interests, including modeling of composite materials, systems design, and systems optimization: The common thread is modeling and analysis. Prior to coming to Boeing in 2001, Paul was on the mechanical engineering faculty at Arizona State University. His work there was design and manufacturing. Previous to ASU, Paul served on the product development technical staff at Alcoa Labs in Pittsburgh. In service to the community, Paul has reviewed many papers, and has served on several academic and research review panels for both review and allocation of research monies. Paul has been invited and has served on international assessments of technology in rapid prototyping. For the past five years, Paul served on the organizing committee for the SuperComputing conferences. This is the fourth year Paul has co-represented Boeing at the NCSA Private Sector Program annual meeting.

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Micheal Glass is the chief engineer for the SIERRA Engineering Analysis Software Suite at Sandia National Laboratories. He received his PhD in chemical engineering from Rice University in 1987 and a BS in chemical engineering from Washington University (St. Louis) in 1978. Since joining Sandia National Laboratories in 1987, he has been involved with algorithm and software development for high-performance computing. He has developed modeling and simulation capabilities at Sandia for a wide range of applications, such as fuel-air explosives, laser ignition systems, investment casting, electro-thermal-chemical plasma flows, vorticity methods for large-scale CFD simulations, thermal radiation, thermal contact mechanics, and transient dynamic contact mechanics.

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William Gropp is the Paul and Cynthia Saylor Professor in the Department of Computer Science and deputy directory for research for the Institute of Advanced Computing Applications and Technologies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his PhD in computer science from Stanford University in 1982. He was on the faculty of the Computer Science Department of Yale University from 1982-1990 and from 1990-2007 he was a member of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. His research interests are in parallel computing, software for scientific computing, and numerical methods for partial differential equations. He is a Fellow of ACM and IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

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Keven Hofstetter joined Caterpillar Inc. in 1988 after earning a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University. Keven completed a one-year training program and then joined the Performance Analysis section within Caterpillar's Product Development Center of Excellence. He has spent most of the last 20 years in the area of virtual product development. Keven is a research program manager responsible for the VPD Supporting Technology Research program. He develops technologies such as large-scale rigid and flexible multi-body dynamics, implement-earth interaction models, tire and track-soil interaction models and virtual operator models. His primary focus is the development of virtual tools that can be used to drive product development. Keven serves as Caterpillar Inc's liaison to the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois and is a member of the Council on Competitiveness HPC Initiative Manufacturing Working Group.

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Barbara Hutchings manages strategic alliances and HPC product strategy at ANSYS, Inc. and has been involved in the computer-aided engineering software business for 25 years.

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Wen-mei W. Hwu is a professor and holds the Sanders-AMD Endowed Chair in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests are in the area of architecture, implementation, and software for high-performance computer systems. He is the director of the IMPACT research group. For his contributions in research and teaching, he received the ACM SigArch Maurice Wilkes Award, the ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award, the Tau Beta Pi Daniel C. Drucker Eminent Faculty Award, and ISCA Most Influential Paper Award. He is a fellow of IEEE and ACM. He leads the GSRC Concurrent Systems Theme and the Illinois CUDA Center of Excellence. He co-directs the $18 million Universal Parallel Computing Research Center with Marc Snir and serves as one of the principal investigators of the $208 million Blue Waters petascale supercomputer project. Hwu received his PhD in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Seid Koric earned his BS in mechanical engineering from the University of Sarajevo in 1993, MS in aerospace engineering in 1999, and PhD in mechanical engineering in 2006 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has more than 13 years of experience at NCSA, conducting cutting-edge applied research and providing user support to the national computational mechanics communities, both academic and industrial, on the center's high-performance computing platforms. In 2011, Koric will be teaching finite element and senior design classes in the departments of Mechanical Science and Engineering and Aerospace Engineering. His work has resulted in numerous journal and conference publications, and he is the author of a book published by VDM Verlag in 2009. His research interests are in multi-physics modeling of various processes on continuum level and sparse solver technologies on petascale machines.

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Gabriel Mateescu has more than 10 years of experience in high performance and distributed computing. He has developed data- and compute-intensive applications, such as bioinformatics and high-energy physics simulations, and has designed and built distributed systems for managing and executing these applications. Gabriel has worked on projects such as the LHC Computing Grid, the Distributed European Infrastructure for Supercomputing Applications (DEISA), GridCanada, and NIH MIDAS. Gabriel holds a PhD in computer science from Virginia Tech and is the recipient of the CANARIE Information Highway Award for outstanding innovation in information technology.

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Cynthia McIntyre is a senior vice president at the United States Council on Competitiveness. As the chief technologist at the council, she is leading the High-Performance Computing Initiative. Additionally, she oversees strategic operations, planning and development. McIntyre received her doctoral degree in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prior to joining the council, she served as chief of staff to the president at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the nation's oldest technological research university. Her leadership and oversight of the Office of Intellectual Property, Technology Transfer and New Ventures guided this portfolio to become a successful enterprise for Rensselaer. In five years the portfolio increased licensing revenue by a factor of 30 and several startup companies were spun out of university research. Additionally, McIntyre co-led the program and architectural design and development of a new research and performance platform, EMPAC (Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center), at Rensselaer. Also, she managed the institutional performance planning process, monitored campus-wide progress on the university's strategic plan, and managed the budget for the Office of the President. McIntyre was a professor in the Department of Physics at George Mason University from 1994-1999. Her research focus was theoretical studies of electron-phonon interactions in III-V semiconductor heterostructures for optical transitions and electron transport. McIntyre has served as a visiting research scientist at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.

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Loren K. Miller is founder of DataMetric Innovations, where he focuses on creating competitive advantage through simulation-based engineering and science and industry/high-performance computing center/national laboratory collaboration. He is working with the U.S. Department of Defense on the CREATE Project. While at Goodyear, he initiated and led the development of a parametric design system, the partnership with Sandia, simulation-based product development, and Linux cluster supercomputing. Miller has an MS in Physics from the University of Akron. Contact him at loren.miller@mac.com.

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Barbara Minsker is a professor of Environmental and Water Resources Systems Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and is an Associate Provost Fellow in the Office of the Provost at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her research uses information technology to improve understanding and management of complex environmental systems. She has received numerous awards for her research, including the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Army Young Investigator Award, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the American Society for Civil Engineers’ Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize, Xerox Award for Faculty Research, and the University of Illinois Scholar Award. She earned her BS in Operations Research and Industrial Engineering in 1986, served as a policy consultant to the Environmental Protection Agency from 1986-1990, earned her PhD in Environmental Systems Engineering from Cornell University in 1995, served as a post-doctoral research associate at the University of Vermont from 1995-1996, and has been at the University of Illinois since 1996.

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Todd Needham is a 20-year veteran of Microsoft, having spent more than a decade in Microsoft Research working with the academic and government HPC community long before Microsoft had a commercial HPC offering. He is a Group Product Manager for Windows HPC Server with specific responsibility for building a successful ISV and open-source ecosystem.

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Ed Seminaro is the Chief Hardware System Architect for IBM's Power Processor Based p575 High Performance Server Products, is one of IBM's lead overall server and storage architects, and is an IBM Fellow in the System and Technology Group. Ed and his team are responsible for establishing and executing the system design of IBM's POWER575 Systems. Ed has a BS in electrical engineering from Rutgers University and has completed graduate work in electrical engineering at Syracuse University. In the workplace Ed has been involved in the design, development and manufacturing of traditional mainframe and UNIX servers and storage for over 28 years in both technical and management roles. He has deep technical expertise in the areas of computer engineering, circuit design, packaging, cooling, system design and in the past has been viewed as an industry expert in the area of high-frequency power conversion. He is credited with many industry advances that have enabled IBM to maintain leadership in the server industry; especially in the areas of packaging density, RAS, and power efficiency. Today he is looked at throughout the IBM corporation as one of the key architects of future server and storage products.

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