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SNAC Participant Bios

Robert Ackland Robert Ackland holds a PhD in Economics from the Australian National University, MA (Economics) from Yale University and B. Commerce (Economics) from the University of Melbourne and is a Research Fellow in the Research School of Social Sciences at the ANU. Robert's PhD research was in the application of index number theory to global comparisons of income and poverty. Since 1994, he has worked as a consultant in poverty analysis and targeting for organizations such as The World Bank (based in Washington. D.C., 1995-1997), Asian Development Bank and AusAID and has also worked on capacity building projects in these areas. More recently, Robert moved into a new area of research at the intersection of information science and empirical social science -- the development of new methods (and associated software) for quantitative analysis of social and economic phenomena on the Internet. Robert is developing research methods that combine information retrieval, data visualization and more traditional quantitative social science methods and is co-Chief Investigator on an Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Project titled "New Methods for Researching the Existence and Impact of Political Networks on the WWW" (2004-2006). He is also co-chief investigator on an ARC Special Research Initiative (e-Research Support) project for the establishment of the Virtual Observatory for the Study of Online Networks. Robert is taking a leading role in establishing e-Research in the social sciences (or e-Social Science) in Australia, and co-organized the First Australian e-Social Science Symposium, held at the ANU in November 2004.

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Lada Adamic Lada A. Adamic is an assistant professor in the School of Information. Her research interests center on information dynamics in networks: how information diffuses, how it can be found, and how it influences the evolution of a network's structure. She worked previously in Hewlett-Packard's Information Dynamics Lab on research projects relating to networks constructed from large data sets. These projects included mining the medical literature for gene-disease connections, tracking and modeling information flow in E-mail and blog networks, modeling search processes on real-world social networks, and building expertise-finding systems.

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Eytan Adar Eytan Adar is currently a graduate student at the University of Washington in the Computer Science and Engineering department. Most recently he was a researcher at HP Labs and at Xerox PARC before that. His research focus is the study of the behavior of large user populations in digital spaces. In general, he is very interested in the study and application of information side-effects. These are the pieces of data that users produce as part of their daily digital existence. Though not originally intended for this purpose, the data can be used to construct novel tools (e.g. building better search by using web-surfing behavior) as well as mined to answer fundamental questions of individual and social behavior. An example of this is his work with Lada Adamic on modeling and predicting information propagation by analyzing weblogs. Understanding these networks requires large-scale crawls and the application of computationally intensive algorithms and he is very interested in infrastructures that support this kind of research. Another recent, and continuing, project is the Graph Exploration System (GUESS). GUESS allows researchers in many fields to explore, analyze, and visualize networks using a domain specific language (an extension of Python). The language supports work with graphs where nodes and edges have arbitrary properties as well as the construction of new visualization applications. The Java-based system is available under a GPL license from http://www.graphexploration.org/. He received his Bachelor and Master degrees at MIT in Computer Science. More information and papers are available at http://www.cond.org/.

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Vladimir Batagelj Vladimir Batagelj is Professor of Discrete and Computational mathematics at the University of Ljubljana. He is a chair of the Department of theoretical computer science, IMPM, Ljubljana. His main research interests are in mathematics and computer science, combinatorics with emphasis on graph theory, algorithms on graphs and networks, combinatorial optimization, algorithms and data structures, cluster analysis, visualization and applications of information technology in education. He is a member of IEEE, IFCS Group at Large, Classification Society of North America, The international network for social network analysis, International Association for Statistical Computing, and elected member of International Statistical Institute. He is a member of editorial boards of Informatica and of Journal of Social Structure. With Andrej Mrvar (and Matjaˇz Zaverˇsnik) he is developing from 1996 a program Pajek for analysis and visualization of large networks. In the past years they won several first prizes in the graph drawing contests. He co-authored two books on network analysis published recently by the Cambridge University Press: W. de Nooy, A. Mrvar, V. Batagelj: Exploratory Social Network Analysis with Pajek P. Doreian, V. Batagelj, A. Ferligoj: Generalized Blockmodeling.

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Katy Borner Katy Börner is an Associate Professor of Information Science in the School of Library and Information Science, Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Informatics, Core Faculty of Cognitive Science, Research Affiliate of the Biocomplexity Institute, Member of the Advanced Visualization Laboratory and directs the Information Visualization lab at Indiana University. Her research focuses on the development of data analysis and visualization techniques that improve information access, understanding, and management. She is particularly interested in the study of the structure and evolution of scientific disciplines; the analysis and visualization of online activity, e.g., user actions in 3D virtual worlds; and the development of cyberinfrastructures for scientific collaboration and computation, e.g., the information visualization cyberinfrastructure (http://iv.slis.indiana.edu/). She co-edited a book on 'Visual Interfaces to Digital Libraries' published by Springer in 2002, a special issue of PNAS on 'Mapping Knowledge Domains' published in April 2004, a special issue on 'Collaborative Information Visualization Environments' in PRESENCE: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, MIT Press that appeared in Feb. 2005, and a special issue on 'Information Visualization Interfaces for Retrieval and Analysis' in the Journal of Digital Libraries that appeared in March 2005. Börner is the recipient of many fellowships and awards, including Outstanding Junior Faculty Award, Pervasive Technology Laboratories Fellowship, SBC Fellow, NSF CAREER Award, and Trustees Teaching Award. She is currently PI or Co-PI on 12 grants that are funded by NSF, the James S. McDonnell Foundation, 21st Century Fund, and SUN Microsystems.

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David Brandon David Brandon, General Administrator with the Theoretical and Computational Biophysics Group, started with the group as part of BioCoRE's evaluation team, and soon expanded responsibility to evaluation of the group's other software packages. Following completion of a doctoral degree in organizational communication, with an emphasis on small group phenomena, he moved into an administrative position with the group. Currently, he performs a range of duties, from evaluation to training programs to proposal preparation to dissemination activities.

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Larry Brandt Larry Brandt joined the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 1976 and in 1984 he was a member of the management team for NSF's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing. Larry stayed with the Supercomputer Centers program for 14 years as a program manager. In the early 1990s Larry made several small grants to the undergraduates on the software development team at NCSA, resulting in the first multimedia Web browser (Mosaic) and a related server in January of 1993. To respond to the demand of early Web users for better faster Mosaic development, Larry assembled a consortium of 15 interested Federal agencies who agreed to provide $3M over three years. Generalizing from that experience, in 1998 Larry created and still manages the NSF's Digital Government research program, which funds collaboration between academic researchers and government agencies. Valerie Gregg, on detail from the US Census Bureau to NSF, was the key collaborator in the program's development. The Digital Government program crosses all computer and information science disciplines and all gov't domains and missions, from international and Federal agencies to local levels and supports primarily technical projects. In the last three years, an additional emphasis on projects from the policy, organizational, political and social sciences has been added. These encompass, for example, projects to explore the impact of IT on government organizations, the impact of IT on democracy, and e-voting. The program has funded over 100 research grants, with a current budget of about $10M per year. More about the program can be found at the web site http://www.digitalgovernment.org/.

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Carter Butts Carter T. Butts received his Ph.D. in sociology from Carnegie Mellon University, and is currently assistant professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Butts's research involves the application of formal (i.e., mathematical and computational) techniques to theoretical and methodological problems within the areas of social network analysis, mathematical sociology, quantitative methodology, and human judgment and decision making. Substantively, his current work focuses on modeling the structure of spatially embedded interpersonal networks, sexual contact networks, assignment processes, and individual and organizational interaction in crisis settings. The latter includes the RESCUE project (an NSF-funded interdisciplinary collaboration centered on improving information technology in the context of crisis response). His current methodological work includes hierarchical Bayesian models for network inference and time-dependent processes, and the use of discrete exponential families for direct modeling of network structure, structural comparison, and assignment systems. He is the primary author/maintainer of several software packages for social network analysis (including sna, network, and net theory), which can be found at http://erzuli.ss.uci.edu/R.stuff/. He is also involved with the Statnet project, which is an NIH-funded effort to produce tools for the statistical modeling and analysis of social networks. Dr. Butts is a member of UCI's Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences and the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, and serves on the council of the American Sociological Association's section on Mathematical Sociology.

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Pamela Clark Pamela I. Clark is a senior research scientist at Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation. She holds a dual master's degree in Epidemiology and Biostatistics and a PhD in Epidemiology from the University of South Florida in Tampa. Her current research projects include a laboratory study of human smoking profiles over a range of cigarette products, two studies which aims to identify quality process and outcome indicators to evaluate the impact of comprehensive tobacco use prevention and control programs, and a study of advertising and promotion of tobacco products in retail stores. Her work that is most pertinent to SNAC is the National Cancer Institute Tobacco Control Research Branch's Initiative on the Study and Implementation of Systems (ISIS). ISIS is an ambitious project to apply systems thinking methodologies to practices in tobacco control, including building the cyberinfrastructury necessary to enable transdisciplinariness, support development of knowledge networks, and promote a seamless continuum from discover to development to delivery of new knowledge.

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Noshir Contractor Noshir Contractor is a Professor in the Departments of Speech Communication and Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a Research Affiliate of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Director of the Science of Networks in Communities (SONIC) Research Group at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, and Co-Director of the Age of Networks Initiative at the Center for Advanced Study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research program is investigating factors that lead to the formation, maintenance, and dissolution of dynamically linked knowledge networks among communities involved in emergency response, food safety, public health, and environmental engineering. His research, funded continuously for the past decade by major grants from the U.S. National Science Foundation, has been published in Academy of Management Review, Communication Research, Computational and Mathematical Organizational Theory, Decision Science, Human Communication Research, Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Journal of Cultural Economics, Organization Science, Small Group Research, and Social Psychology Quarterly. His papers have received top-paper awards from both the International Communication Association and the National Communication Association. His book titled "Theories of Communication Networks" (co-authored with Professor Peter Monge and published by Oxford University Press) received the 2003 Book of the Year award from the Organizational Communication Division of the National Communication Association. He is the lead developer of IKNOW (Inquiring Knowledge Networks On the Web), a web-based social networking software and Blanche, a software program to simulate the dynamics of social networks. For more information, see http://sonic.ncsa.uiuc.edu/.

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Steven Corman Steven R. (Steve) Corman (PhD University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1988) is a Professor in the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. There he is Director of the Consortium for Strategic Communication, which brings ideas from communication theory and research to bear on problems of counter-terrorism and national security. In a related capacity he serves on a scientific advisory committee for U.S. Special Operations Command. Corman is currently Chair of the Organizational Communication Division of the International Communication Association. In that capacity he leads effort supported by SONIC and NCSA, to make the Enron e-mail dataset available to researchers in communication and other disciplines through a user-friendly interface. More information on the project is available at http://sonic.ncsa.uiuc.edu/enron/. Corman is former co-director of the ASU Software Factory Project, a recently-completed effort. Its research objective was to create a complete record of communication in a "real" (albeit small) organization over an extended period of time. The project has collected over 12,000 hours of recorded talk of 54 participants over three years. This is supported by 400 recorded interviews, a weekly perceived social network survey (127 time points), ethnographic observation notes, time tracking, and software engineering data. More information is available at http://www.public.asu.edu/~corman/sunbelt05.ppt. Finally Corman is cofounder and Chief Technology Office of Crawdad Technologies LLC, a software firm specializing in network text analysis. More information is available at http://www.crawdadtech.com/.

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Donna Cox Donna J. Cox is Professor in the School of Art and Design at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and the Director for Visualization and Experimental Technologies at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. Cox received the international Coler-Maxwell Award for Excellence granted by the Leonardo International Society in Arts Science and Technology for her seminal paper on "Renaissance Teams." Cox has written numerous publications on scientific and information visualization. She is a recognized international keynote speaker at research institutions in countries including Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, Finland, Japan, and Switzerland. Inviting institutions include MIT, Kodak, Motorola, EDUCOM, T.J. Watson Research Center, and the National Library of Medicine. Her collaborative work has been cited, reviewed, or published in over 100 publications including Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and The Chronicle of Higher Education. Cox has been featured in numerous television programs including "Good Morning America." She was Associate Producer for Scientific Visualization and Art Director for the PIXAR/NCSA segment of the IMAX movie, "Cosmic Voyage," nominated for 1997 Academy Award in documentary short subject category. Recent projects include two Hayden Planetarium digital space shows, American Museum of Natural History in New York City; The Discovery Channel "Unfolding Universe;" and the NOVA HDTV "Runaway Universe" received the 2002 Golden Camera Festival Award. She is juror on the NSF's Visualization Challenge and SIGGRAPH 2005 Emerging Technologies Chair. Cox is currently working on a PBS NOVA show and Denver Museum of Nature and Science Planetarium Digital Dome Show on Black Holes.

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Jonathon Cummings Jonathon Cummings is an Associate Professor of Management at the Fuqua School of Business, Duke University. He spent three years at the MIT Sloan School of Management as an Assistant Professor after completing his dissertation and post-doc at Carnegie Mellon University. During graduate school he interned at Intel (studying collaborative software) and at Motorola (studying knowledge management). He has an undergraduate degree in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan and a master's degree in social psychology from Harvard University. Professor Cummings is the author of NetVis, a free open source web-based tool to analyze and visualize social networks using data from csv files, online surveys, and dispersed teams.

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Roberto Dandi Roberto Dandi is a postdoctoral researcher at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Science of Networks in Communities (SONIC) research group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He obtained his PhD in Organizational Behavior at Universitŕ degli Studi del Molise (Ital) in 2004 with a dissertation on the consequences of email communication on organizational participation in decision making. His research interests, broadly speaking, deal with the organizational and social consequences of Information and Communication Technology. In particular, he has been involved in projects focusing on computer-mediated communication in organizations, on the creation of Virtual Organizations, and on the development of knowledge networks in teams and between organizations. He is focusing now in applying Social Network Analysis for the study of online behavior in communities of scholars and organizations that use cyberinfrastructure.

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Thom Dunning Thom Dunning is the director for the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. He also holds an endowed position as Distinguished Chair for Research Excellence in Chemistry and professor in the department of chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dunning comes to NCSA from Tennessee, where he was the director of the Joint Institute for Computational Sciences in Oak Ridge, a distinguished professor of chemistry and chemical engineering at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, and a distinguished scientist in computing and computational sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Before that, Dunning was responsible for supercomputing and networking for the University of North Carolina System and was a professor of chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Before going to North Carolina, Dunning was assistant director for scientific simulation in the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy, on leave from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In that position, he was instrumental in creating DOE's new scientific computing program, Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC). SciDAC is the federal government's first comprehensive program aimed at developing the software infrastructure needed for scientific computing. Dunning is the former leader of the Theoretical and Computational Chemistry Group at Argonne National Laboratory and was associate director for theory, modeling, and simulation in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as well as EMSL director. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science as well as a member of the American Chemical Society. He received his bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1965 from the University of Missouri-Rolla and his Ph.D. in chemical physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1970.

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Stephen Eubank Stephen Eubank received his B.A. in physics from Swarthmore College in 1979 and his Ph.D. in theoretical particle physics from the University of Texas at Austin in 1986. He has worked in the fields of fluid turbulence (at the La Jolla Institute); nonlinear dynamics and chaos (at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Center for Nonlinear Studies); financial market modeling (as a founder of Prediction Company); ecological time series analysis (at Biosphere 2); and natural language processing (as an invited researcher at Advanced Telecommunication Research in Kyoto, Japan). As a staff member at Los Alamos from 1997-2005. Dr. Eubank played a leading role in development of the traffic microsimulation component of the Transportation Analysis and Simulation System (TRANSIMS); he led the Epidemiology Simulation (EpiSims) project; and he was the team leader for the Urban Infrastructure Suite (UIS), of which both TRANSIMS and EpiSims are parts. UIS is a collection of interoperable simulations of interacting infrastructures, each of which simulates the behavior of every individual in a large urban region. The goal of UIS is to model the dynamics of systems including both physical and social components. In his current position as Deputy Director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Sciences Laboratory at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech, he is pursuing interests in developing advanced technology for the study of large socio-technical systems and understanding the dynamics and structure of social networks.

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Thomas Finholt Thomas A. Finholt is the director of the Collaboratory for Research on Electronic Work at the University of Michigan's School of Information, where he is also a research associate professor. Currently, Dr. Finholt is involved with several cyberinfrastructure projects. First, he is working with the National Center for Supecomputing Applications (NCSA) to understand cyberinfrastructure requirements within the meso-scale weather community and the environmental engineering community. Second, Dr. Finholt is working with the NSF-funded Mid-America Earthquake Center to develop portal-based risk and loss assessment tools. Third, Dr. Finholt is involved with an NSF-sponsored effort to build social networking tools to assist tobacco control researchers. Fourth, Dr. Finholt is working with the San Diego Supercomputer Center as part of the NSF's George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES), where his group is supporting the transition of the NEESgrid software to the Sakai software platform. Fifth, Dr. Finholt is directing the education and outreach cores of the NIH-funded National Center for Integrative Biomedical Informatics. Finally, Dr. Finholt is leading two internal research projects at Michigan, the Michigan Grid Research and Infrastructure Development (MGRID) Center and the Connection Project, an effort to build highly realistic video links among geographically distributed collaborators. In the past, Dr. Finholt was a co-PI on the NEESgrid project and the Space Physics and Aeronomy Research Collaboratory (SPARC). He also led research projects on collaboration technology with NIST and with Bell Labs. Dr. Finholt is a graduate of Swarthmore College and he received his Ph.D. in social and decision sciences from Carnegie Mellon University.

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DanyelFisher Danyel Fisher got his Masters' from UC Berkeley in Computer Science in 2000, and his PhD from UC Irvine, also in Computer Science, in 2004. His dissertation examined the structure of egocentric social networks in email and considered different temporal and social patterns that were visible (http://www.ics.uci.edu/~jpd/publications/2004/chi2004-soylent.pdf, http://www.isr.uci.edu/projects/soylent/). Since late 2004, he has worked for Microsoft Research's Community Technologies Group, home of Netscan. He is now doing research on social roles within Usenet newsgroups (articles in Online Deliberation conference, in JCMC, and in IEEE Internet) based on a social network perspective of response patterns. He is also involved in an email-based project, SNARF, which uses social involvement as a way of sorting and organizing email. SNARF also maintains a log of mail messages, which can be used to reconstruct mail history and social networks; the project is currently analyzing the mass of data obtained from a broad deployment of SNARF across over six hundred users at Microsoft. During his dissertation work, Danyel co-created the open-source JUNG (Java Universal Network/Graph) toolkit, which provides an easy and powerful interface to social network analysis using the Java programming language.

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Gary Giovino Gary Giovino is a Senior Research Scientist and Director of the Tobacco Control Research Program at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York. He also serves as a Research Professor in the SUNY at Buffalo School of Public Health and Health Professions, where he teaches a course in Tobacco Control. His professional interests and activities involve the study of patterns, determinants, consequences, and control of tobacco use. He is becoming increasingly interested in the role of nutrition in health and disease and in wellness. His four major research projects involve surveys. He is the Principal Investigator on the National Youth Smoking Cessation Survey, a two year nationally-representative cohort study of 2,582 16-24 year old smokers. The purpose of this study is to document the natural history of quitting smoking among older adolescent and young adult smokers. This month (November 2005) Giovino and colleagues will finalize data collection, completing the 24-month assessment. Gary Giovino is also PI on the Assessing Hard Core Smoking Survey, a nationally-representative cohort survey of 1,000 current smokers (ages 25 years and older) and 256 recent former smokers. The purpose of this study is to assess patterns and determinants of "hard-core" smoking in the United States. Third, he is PI on Policy Effects of Cigarette Design, Emissions, and Behavior, Project 3 of the Roswell Park's Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center (TTURC)(K. Michael Cummings, PI). As such, he leads work investigating cigarette product characteristics and smoke chemistries, coordinating efforts of data collection around our surveys in the USA, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, Malaysia, and Thailand, with activity about to begin in China. He is also head the Tobacco Team on Project ImpacTeen, a research project designed to better understand program and policy interventions to reduce adolescent tobacco, alcohol, and illicit substance use and abuse. He is also very interested in the role that suboptimal nutrition may play in the development and maintenance of addiction, particularly nicotine addiction and in the role that optimal nutrition may have in accelerating the disease risk reduction trajectory in former smokers. He is working to improve the work of the nation's tobacco surveillance system, attempting to coordinate work that monitors products, users and potential users, the tobacco industry, and environmental influences such as media and policy. He also serves on the New York State Tobacco Control Advisory Board, where he (and others) advises the State to implement evidence-based tobacco control strategies.

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Harold Green Harold D. Green, Jr. (Hank) holds a Ph.D. from the University of Florida Department of Anthropology with specializations in research design and qualitative and quantitative methods of social research, including social network analysis theory, method, and application. Beginning in 2001, Hank spent one and a half years evaluating cooperation among commodity-based international development organizations in Washington DC, applying structural measures used in social network analysis to questions of collaboration and network growth and health. Hank was a National Institute of Mental Health Postdoctoral Training Fellow at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 2003-2005, continuing his studies of quantitative social research, applied statistics, research design, and applied social network analysis. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. With the Science of Networks in Communities (SONIC) research group, Hank has been active in projects that combine his qualitative and quantitative interests. Hank works primarily with communities of practice to explore and enable collaboration using social network analysis. Hank's personal research interests include developing indicators and methods to explore relational structures inherent in multiplex social environments. These approaches build on permutation based tests and on clustering and scaling techniques. He also collaborates with Dr. Christopher McCarty (University of Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research) to investigate personal network structure and its relationship with personality and behavioral traits.

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Doug Gregor Doug Gregor's background is in the areas of programming languages, programming methodologies, compilers, and the construction of high-performance, generic software libraries. The last of these is directly relevant to this workshop, because the Open Systems Laboratory has been developing generic software libraries of graph (network) algorithms and data structures for several years. The best known of these projects is the generic Boost Graph Library (BGL), available http://www.boost.org/libs/graph/doc/. More recently, Goug Gregor and his colleagues have developed the Parallel BGL, available at http://www.osl.iu.edu/research/pbgl/, which extends the BGL to parallel computation on clusters, allowing them to perform queries on graphs with tens of millions of nodes and billions of edges within a few seconds on a medium-sized cluster. For all their capabilities, the BGL and Parallel BGL are only low-level infrastructure libraries on which one could build interesting applications for social network analysis.

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Keith Hampton Keith N. Hampton, Assistant Professor in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, received his Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of Toronto in sociology, and a B.A. in sociology from the University of Calgary. From 2001-2005 he was Assistant Professor of Technology, Urban and Community Sociology and held the Class of '43 Career Development Chair in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests focus on the relationship between information and communication technologies, social networks, and the urban environment. Recent projects include: (i) i-neighbors.org -- a free, public resource where people find their geographic neighborhoods online and form corresponding digital communities. The i-neighbors project investigates in detail the specific contexts where Internet use affords local interactions and facilitates community involvement. I-neighbors.org is also an experiment in e-democracy, exploring the potential for new information and communication technologies to expand political participation. (ii) E-neighbors -- a three year, longitudinal study of four Boston neighborhoods that i) examines the relationship between media use and the composition of people's social networks, and ii) explores the potential for new information and communication technologies to expand social networks, social capital and community involvement at the neighborhood level. (iii) Grande Wi-Fi -- an exploratory study of how Wi-Fi infrastructures influences social relationships in paid and free Wi-Fi cafes in Boston and Seattle. Netville -- a three-year survey and ethnographic investigation of how living in a newly developed residential community, equipped with a series of advanced computer and communication technologies as part of its design, affects community relations.

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Eszter Hargittai Eszter Hargittai is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies and Sociology, and Faculty Fellow of the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University where she heads the Web-Use Project. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Princeton University where she was a Wilson Scholar. Before joining the faculty at Northwestern, she was a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Her research focuses on the social and policy implications of information technologies with a particular interest in how IT may contribute to or alleviate social inequalities. Her research projects have looked at differences in people's Web-use skills, the evolution of search engines and the organization and presentation of online content, political uses of information technologies, and how IT are influencing the types of cultural products people consume. In addition to her academic articles, her work has also been featured on CNNfn, the BBC's Web site and several national dailies. Her work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Markle Foundation, the Dan David Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. In 2006/07 she will be a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford.

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Caroline Haythornthwaite Caroline Haythornthwaite is Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research examines how the Internet and computer media support and affect work, learning, and social interaction. Her research examines how information is exchanged, knowledge is shared and co-constructed, collaboration happens, and community forms. Studies have examined social networks of work and media use among researchers, the formation of social networks and media use over time in online classes, and social networks of knowledge sharing in collaborative research teams. Other work examines the development and nature of community online, communication issues for new online learners, distributed knowledge processes, and the nature and constraints of interdisciplinary collaboration. Her studies of social networks and media use show that those with stronger ties communicate via more media than weakly ties pairs (media multiplexity), and that, within groups, media are found in pairs' repertoires in a similar order. This suggests that group mandated means of communication provide a 'latent tie' structure on which pairs can build weak and then stronger ties (see papers in The Information Society, and Information, Communication and Society). Major publications include The Internet in Everyday Life (2002, edited with Barry Wellman); Learning, Culture and Community in Online Education: Research and Practice (2004, edited with Michelle M. Kazmer), a special issue of Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication on "Computer-Mediated Collaborative Practices and Systems" (2005), and Handbook of E-learning Research (in preparation, edited with Richard Andrews).

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Bruce Herr Bruce Herr is a Computer Software Engineer for Katy Börner's InfoVis Lab at IU. He graduated from Indiana University with a BS in Computer Science. His main career goal is to make really cool, extensible, and easy to use software. Current projects are the IVC, Taxonomy Validator (in production), and IVC-DB. He mainly programs in Java using the revolutionary Eclipse IDE and leveraging other open source technologies as needed.

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Raquell Holmes Raquell Holmes received her Ph.D. in the area of cellular, developmental biology from Tufts Sackler School of Biomedical Sciences. After a post doc at Dana Farber Cancer Research Institute she joined Boston University's Center for Computational Science to manage the Education, Outreach and Training Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (EOT-PACI). Her focus in the context of EOT-PACI and now EPIC (Engaging People in CyberInfrastructure) has been on building community within and beyond the NSF funded partnerships. In addition to participating in the leadership of EOT-PACI, Dr. Holmes headed the development of the EOT-PACI website and Metrics Online. These tools served the partnership and its audiences by making visible the activities and products of the PACI partners. The development of the Metrics tool required establishing rudimentary measures of collaboration within the partnerships. This has included linkages between institutions, projects and specific events or products. An historical overview of the tools development has been posted. Dr. Holmes also develops materials for training biologists in the area of modeling and simulation. This work builds on the computational science education and training efforts within EPIC, identifies numerical modeling applications easy to use for biologists and supplements these tools with curricular materials and professional development workshops. Through this work Dr. Holmes has developed a high-level understanding of metabolic pathways, biological database implementations and distinctions between static and dynamic analyses of biological systems at the cellular and molecular levels.

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Eric Jakobsson Eric Jakobsson is in the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and also has major commitments to the Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology and the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology on that campus. He has just returned to campus from a two-year term as Director of the Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the Chair of the Biomedical Information Science and Technology Initiative Consortium at the National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Maryland. Jakobsson's research and academic interests are centered on computational studies of membrane structure and transport, and on the use of computation in education. He is the Principal Investigator of a newly awarded NIH Nanomedicine Development Center that is part of the NIH Roadmap. His primary immediate interest in Social Network Theory is in applying it to the management of a bioengineering project that must be focused on coherent goals while being distributed across 10 institutions that span 9 time zones.

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Karrie Karahalios Karrie Karahalios is an assistant professor in the Computer Science department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her work focuses on the interaction between people and the social cues they perceive in networked electronic spaces. Of particular interest are interfaces for pubic online and physical gathering spaces such as chatrooms, cafes, parks, etc. The goal is to create interfaces that enable users to perceive conversational patterns that are present, but not obvious, in traditional communication interfaces. Her most recent work involved integrating social catalysts into the design of interfaces for connecting spaces using audio and video. Previous projects include: Visiphone, a communication object that visualizes conversation patterns between two spaces; Hear&Here, an augmented reality interface for placing sound envelopes in space and retrieving them with an audio interface; Chit Chat Club, a hybrid social space that combines the immediacy of the traditional cafe with the global reach and easy introductions of an online chat. Ongoing research involves (i) analyzing patterns in cell phone conversations among groups of people and visualizing them to get a better understanding of mobile conversation patterns. (2) developing interfaces for incorporating emotion into mediated communication archives. (3) developing interactive furniture interfaces for collocated interaction among people about a table to show "value" on communication. Karrie completed a SB in electrical engineering, an MEng in electrical engineering and computer science, and an SM in media arts and science and a PhD in media arts and science at MIT.

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David Knoke David Knoke is professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota. He received his Ph.D. in 1972 from the University of Michigan and was professor of sociology at Indiana University from 1972 to 1985. He was a Fulbright research scholar at Kiel University (1989) and a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (1992). In 1982, Knoke and James Kuklinski published a basic primer, Network Analysis. With various colleagues, he received several National Science Foundation research grant and published their results in research monographs on political and organizational behavior, including The Organizational State, Organizing for Collective Action, Political Networks, Organizations in America, Comparing Policy Networks, and Changing Organizations. Recent research interests include organizational theories, economic sociology, strategic alliances, and social network analysis. Knoke is currently investigating the formation and consequences of strategic alliances in the global information sector, using a data on more than 4,000 research, development, production, and marketing collaborations from 1989-2000 among the world's 150 largest corporations in the computer, publishing, motion picture, broadcasting, telecommunications, information services, and data processing industries.

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Laura Koehly Laura Koehly, Ph.D. is an Investigator in the National Human Genome Research Institutes of the National Institutes of Health. She is the Head of the Social Network Methods Section of the Social and Behavioral Research Branch. Dr. Koehly completed her Ph.D. in quantitative psychology at the University of Illinois - Urbana/Champaign, after which she completed post-doctoral training at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Her current research focuses on the development of social network methodologies to measure and model the complexities of family systems, the utilization of these methods to understand the social, psychological, and communicative context of families at risk for hereditary disease, and the translation of this understanding into effective network-based interventions that facilitate the delivery of genetic counseling services and dissemination of risk information. Her work extends traditional approaches that focus on a single family member to a social network approach, which allows one to develop a more realistic understanding of the dissemination process when communicating health information through a family. Additionally, she is interested in understanding how formal support systems, such as health care providers (i.e. genetic counselors, general practitioners) participate in the process of decision making, communication and support for at-risk family members. Dr. Koehly's methodological research interests focus on the development of stochastic models for three-way social network data and interdependent ego-centered network data.

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Gavin La Rowe Gavin La Rowe will complete a Masters in Information Science at Indiana University this fall. Aside from his role as the InfoVis CyberInfrastructure database administrator, Gavin's research primarily focuses on information retrieval (TREC & NTCIR), multi-dimensional scaling, ontology inference engines, automated classification and rdf search engines. He is currently a technical lead for the Web Information Discovery Integration Laboratory (WIDIT) and the Classification-based Search and Knowledge Discovery tool (CSKD). Gavin also works on multi-lingual information retrieval and knowledge discovery tools for East Asian languages. He is the lead developer for the Thesaurus Linguae Sericae project, formerly hosted at the University of Heidelberg. His research interests include: large-scale multi-dimensional scaling, ontology inference engines, information visualization, classification search and knowledge discovery.

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David Lazer David M. J. Lazer, Associate Professor of Public Policy, is director and founder of the Program on Networked Governance. Lazer has written extensively on the process by which connections emerge among actors and the consequences that the resultant network has for individuals and the system. With the support of the NSF, he has launched a Web-based forum on the use of DNA in the criminal justice system, which has the objective of facilitating knowledge sharing within that community. He holds a PhD in political science from the University of Michigan.

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Roger Leenders Roger Leenders is an associate professor of Business Development at the School of Management, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. His main research interest is in how social networks within and between groups/teams of individuals affect the performance of groups and teams. Primarily, he studies the effect of intra- and interteam networks on the creativity and innovativeness of teams and on the creation of knowledge by teams. His main empirical field is that of teams involved in R&D, both in goods and services. He both studies teams of co-located iundivuals and virtual sets of teams that communicate through electronic means. In addition to the study of creativity and knowledge, a second major field of study relates to the modeling of social influence. Here he has developed network autocorrelation models that allow one to estimate and test various regimes of influence that may occur through network relations. From a more substantive point of view he studies language patterns that people use to influence their network partners. This also ties in with work in which he studies how social networks can be created/influenced/engineered so as to increase payoff for (all or several) network members. Being an econometrician by training, he enjoys building mathematical and statistical models of social networks. As a business scholar, he enjoys the creation and testing of theory. He received his Ph.D. at the Interuniversity Center for Social Science Theory and Methodology, University of Groningen. His papers have appeared in a variety of journals such as Social Networks, Journal of Mathematical Sociology, Journal of Engineering and Technology Management, Journal of Product Innovation Management, Creativity and Innovation Management, Technovation, Team Performance Management.

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Michael Macy Michael Macy is Professor and Chair of Sociology at Cornell. In a series of studies funded by the National Science Foundation, his research team used computational models and laboratory experiments with human subjects to explore how threshold effects in network interactions might generate familiar but enigmatic social patterns, such as the emergence and collapse of fads, the spread of self-destructive behaviors, and the polarization of opinion. Macy pioneered the use of agent based models in sociology to explore the effects of heterogeneity, bounded rationality, and network structure on the dynamics and stability of social systems (http://hsd.soc.cornell.edu/Macy.htm). He now heads a team of social, information, and computer scientists who are building tools that will make the Internet Archive accessible for research on social and information networks (http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=104477). He also leads a Cornell initiative to promote cross-disciplinary collaborative research and teaching on social and information networks.

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Madhav Marathe Madhav Marathe is Professor at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute (VBI) and Department. of Computer Science, and Deputy Director, VBI Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. With over eight years of experience in project leadership and technology development, Professor Marathe specializes in population dynamics, telecommunication systems, epidemiology, design and architecture of the data grid design and analysis of algorithms for data manipulation, design of services-oriented architectures, and socio-technical systems. Currently he is on the external advisory board of ONR funded National Center for Advanced Secure Systems research. Professor Marathe has led the development of a computational theory of discrete simulations based on discrete dynamical systems, and the development of methods and tools for simulation-based representation, analysis, and generation of large socio-technical networks. He has published more than 125 research articles in peer reviewed journals, conferences, and books over the last fifteen years, including SIAM J. Computing, MONET, JSAC, and TCS. He has managed long-term research contracts and collaborations with a number of universities, has been PI and Co-PI on more than a dozen funded research programs, and has served as PC member for conferences and workshops.

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Sean Mason Sean Mason is a Research Programmer working in SONIC (Science of Networks in Communities) at NCSA. Current projects include CI-KNOW (Cyberinfrastructure Knowledge Networks on the Web) and its predecessor IKNOW (Inquiring Knowledge Networks on the Web). His current research interests include making useful social network analysis-based recommendations for users of cyberinfrastructures. He programs primarily in Java and Python.

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Chris McCarty Chris McCarty is director of the University of Florida Survey Research Center, a 75-station telephone survey lab. He received an undergraduate degree in anthropology from West Virginia University in 1980 and a doctorate in anthropology from the University of Florida in 1992. He has conducted research in Mexico, and West Africa and consulted on USAID-funded projects in Cameroon, Ghana, Mali and Jamaica. McCarty's primary research interests are in the area of social networks, specializing in the measurement and analysis of personal networks -- the set of family, friends and acquaintances surrounding a focal person. His most recent work is in the area of personal network structure and visualization. He developed a Java program called EgoNet for the collection and analysis of personal networks. This program was recently re-written in Delphi by MDLogix of Towson, MD. EgoNet provides a questionnaire authoring language oriented to personal networks. It allows a researcher to visualize individual personal networks, overlay alter attributes, analyze structural attributes and output aggregate files across respondents to SPSS. He is currently applying this program to a project sponsored by the National Science Foundation to use personal networks as a measure of acculturation among Hispanic migrants to the US and African migrants to Spain. McCarty has also conducted social network research on the small world phenomenon, personal network size, and estimating the size of hard-to-count populations. He has published on survey research methods concerning response rates, estimating the demographic effects of hurricanes and adapting consumer confidence measures to developing countries.

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William Michener William Michener has been a Research Professor in the Biology Department at the University of New Mexico since 2000 and a Senior Scientist at the American Institute of Biological Sciences in Washington, DC since 2004. He serves as Associate Director of the National Science Foundation's Long Term Ecological Research Network Office and Co-Director of the National Ecological Observatory Network Project Office in Washington, DC. He is PI for the Science Environment for Ecological Knowledge (a large NSF Information Technology Research Project that involves 9 principal institutions and approximately 45 investigators and programmers). He is the author of more than 70 journal articles and book chapters, and has co-edited four books related to ecological informatics. He is a Certified Senior Ecologist and serves as Editor of Ecological Archives and Associate Editor of the International Journal of Ecological Informatics. His research focuses on ecology of natural and anthropogenic disturbances, design of environmental observatories, and application of scientific data and information technologies to ecology and natural resource management.

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Chris Mueller Chris Mueller has extensive experience developing scientific software and distributed data infrastructures. At Research Systems, he created the first Web scripting language for developing scientific applications, ION Script. An important design goal in his applications is to make high-end computing accessible to end-users by finding the appropriate balance between abstraction and functionality that enables users and developers to be most productive. Currently, he is pursing a PhD in Computer Science at Indiana University and is exploring software and hardware architectures for large graph mining and visualization.

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Edward Palazzolo Edward T. Palazzolo, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is an assistant professor in the School of Communication at The Ohio State University where he teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in organizational communication. He is the director of the Communication Research on Information and Organizational Systems Laboratory (Curious Lab: http://curious.comm.ohio-state.edu/). While at the University of Illinois he worked as a research assistant in the TECLab under the direction of Noshir Contractor on multiple projects and focused most of his time on an NSF funded grant in the area of Knowledge and Distributed Intelligence. His current research focuses on communication and knowledge networks and their impact on team performance in organizational settings. He recently received a grant from the Education Council for his work with the Columbus Public Schools' elementary school and middle school principals to help build a professional learning community and to improve student performance through managing communication and knowledge networks.

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W. Bradford Paley W. Bradford Paley uses computers to create visual displays with the goal of making readable, clear, and engaging expressions of complex data. His visual representations are inspired by the calm, richly layered information in natural scenes. His process applies three perspectives: [1] rendering methods used by fine artists and graphic artists are [2] informed by their possible underpinnings in human perception, then [3] applied to creating narrowly-scoped, almost idiosyncratic representations whose visual semantics are often driven by the real-world metaphors of the experts who know the domains best. Brad did his first computer graphics in 1973, graduated Phi Beta Kappa from UC Berkeley in 1981, founded Digital Image Design Incorporated in 1982, and started doing financial & statistical data visualization in 1986. He has exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art; he created TextArc.org; he is in the ARTPORT collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art; has received multiple grants and awards for both art and design, and his designs are at work every day in the hands of brokers on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. He is an adjunct associate professor at Columbia University, and is director of Information Esthetics: a fledgling interdisciplinary group exploring the creation and interpretation of data representations that are both readable and esthetically satisfying.

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Michael Piasecki Michael Piasecki holds degrees in Civil Engineering from the University of Hannover, Germany (Diplom, 1991) and the University of Michigan (PhD, 1994) with a focus on Water Resources Engineering. He is currently holding the rank of Associate Professor at Drexel University in the Department of Civil, Architectural, & Environmental Engineering, Philadelphia. Dr. Piasecki's research interests centers on the area of HydroInformatics and focuses on the development of metadata profiles for the hydrologic community as well the creation and representation of hydrologic processes and vocabularies using ontologies. Of special interest is the problem of semantic heterogeneity in description of processes and data files and the utilization of ontologies to overcome these heterogeneities. Dr. Piasecki is currently a member of the CUAHSI HIS team developing a prototype information system of the hydrologic community where he has taken the lead on developing the community metadata profile as well as controlled vocabularies for use in the information system. He is also the recipient of a CLEANER planning grant to investigate the CyberInfrastructure needs of a future Environmental Field Facility as part of an Engineering Analyses Network using an existing LTER facility. As part of his community involvement and recognition for his expertise he is a member of the CI advisory committee for CLEANER and the LTER network and has been invited to numerous workshops on CI development organized by the Environmental Observing System communities and NSF.

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Catherine Plaisant Catherine Plaisant, PhD, is Associate Research Scientist and Associate Director of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory of the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies. She earned a Doctorat d'Ingénieur degree in France in 1982 and worked on developing and evaluating user interfaces since then. In 1987 she joined Professor Ben Shneiderman at the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory of the University of Maryland. She works with graduate students from Computer Science, Information Studies or Psychology on designing and evaluating new interface technologies that are useable, useful, and appealing. Research contributions range from focused interaction techniques to innovative visualization techniques validated with user studies and practical applications. The activities that are most relevant to the focus of this workshop all concern the design and evaluation of user interface. Current projects include two user interfaces that look for alternative to the traditional node link diagrams to explore network data: NetLens (which uses coordinated overviews and sorted lists) and TreePlus (which investigate interactive tree representations to present graphs). In an effort to promote the evaluation of information visualization and the development of benchmarks I started the InfoVis Contest which topic in 2004 was the History of InfoVis. Participants were judged on how much insights they could provide about the data (the papers and authors of 10 years of the conference).

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Shashikant Penumarthy Shashikant Penumarthy is a graduate student in the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University, Bloomington. He has a background in Electronics Engineering (B.E.) and Computer Science (M.S.). Currently he is pursuing his PhD in the InfoVis lab focusing on modeling and analysis of the diffusion of information in scientific networks. Other research interests include information visualization, complex systems, network analysis, agent-based models, computer-mediated communication, programming languages and object-oriented frameworks. In the InfoVis lab, he plays the role of software consultant and architect and leads the IVC Software Framework project that aims to build a highly extensible programming-language-independent framework to enable scientists to share code and data unmodified.

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Bill Richards Bill Richards. Network researchers have used eigen decomposition methods either implicitly or explicitly since the late 1960's, when computers became generally accessible in most universities. There are a number of problems with both the methods currently in use and what have come to be seen as "standard" ways of using those methods. The main goal of his research is to develop a unifying theoretical perspective that will address the problems mentioned above, and that will tie together analytic methods previously understood as being unrelated to one another by providing clear links to the mathematical foundation on which they stand, namely algebraic graph theory. His research activities have centered largely around the development and implementation of computer programs for the analysis of communication/information networks: Negopy, MultiNet. A number of research papers he wrote with Andrew Seary are available at http://www.sfu.ca/~richards/Pages/ResearchPapers.html. Besides developing analytic packages such as Negopy and MultiNet, he has presented papers and workshops about eigen analysis methods at annual international conferences of INSNA and ICA. In 2001 Andrew Seary and Bill Richards analysed data for a study of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity involving over 2000 people, 100 symptoms, and 150 exposures, using MultiNet and a new analytic strategy and obtained results showing a clear relationship between symptoms and exposures that had not been seen before. Subsequently, they were asked to extend the methods for use in an NIH-funded multi-national study of Colon Cancer. They attended the symposium on Social Network Analysis for National Security, hosted by the Committee on Human Factors of the National Academy of Sciences, in Washington, D.C., November 7-9, 2002 (http://www.nap.edu/books/0309089522/html/209.html). In August, 2000 Richards organized a Symposium on Networks, Needles, Drugs, Risk, and Infectious Disease that brought 24 network experts and public health practitioners together for three days to examine the social networks of drug users and determine which research strategies would be likely to lead to useful advances. A follow-up meeting will take place in April, 2006 before the annual INSNA Sunbelt Social Network conference.

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Garry Robins Garry Robins is a mathematical psychologist whose research deals with quantitative models for social and relational systems. Methodologically, he focuses on statistical models for social networks, and in particular exponential random graph models (p* models). These models assume that a large-scale network emerges from combinations of local patterns of interaction among small overlapping subsets of people. Such patterns can often be interpreted as the result of a localized social process, a set of behaviours within each subset of individuals. As a result, these models provide ways to examine large scale network structures (the macro- or global level) as the ramification of overlapping and intersecting localized behavioural patterns (the micro- or local level). He has generalised these models to include actor attributes, leading to social influence models and social selection models. More recently, together with his colleagues, Robins has developed new versions of these models, including social settings and new higher order network statistics (Snijders, Pattison, Robins & Handcock, 2005). These new specifications show a dramatically better performance, including in model estimation and fit. They have developed new programs for Monte Carlo maximum likelihood estimation to replace previous approximate estimation techniques. Current work includes: elaborations for directed networks, for multiple networks, and for bipartite graphs; and further development of estimation software. Robins collaborates in many empirical social network research projects, including: structure of sexual networks and HIV transmission; the social epidemiology of mental health in rural areas; health policy and local government networks; environmental governance arrangements; intra-organizational networks; defence-related issues; labor market dynamics; communication networks and stereotype formation; social structures and cultures in sporting teams; political processes; interlocking directorates.

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David Sallach David Sallach is Associate Director of the Center for Complex Adaptive Agent Systems Simulation (CAS2) at the Argonne National Laboratory. He is the current President of the North American Association of Computational Social and Organizational Sciences (NAACSOS), and Program Co-Chair of the World Congress on Social Simulation to be held in Kyoto, Japan in 2006. Sallach received his doctorate in sociology from the University of Nebraska, and taught sociology at Indiana University, Bloomington, and Washington University in Saint Louis. He served for five years as the Director of Social Science Research computing at the University of Chicago, where he commissioned and designed the architecture of the Repast agent simulation toolkit. Sallach's research interests are concentrated on the design of interpretive agent models of social processes.

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Roman Sanguesa Ramon Sangüesa is a professor at UPC, the Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain as well as member of the i2CAT Foundation for Advanced Internet in Catalonia where he coordinates the development of grid computing infrastructures and applications, geared towards collaborative environments. His background comes from Artificial Intelligence with research on Intelligent Agents, Artificial Societies and Machine Learning. His current interests are focused on the emergence on collaborative social and knowledge networks and the integration of different types of technologies for collaboration (from the "low level" upwards: grid, agents, social and knowledge networks, web2.0 applications and interfaces). His current research on social and social networks is centered around the mechanisms of reciprocity, trust, reputation in the interchange of knowledge between agents in a society. Recent work explores the relationship between these characteristics and the emergence of several types of networks. Some of the results of this research has been applied to the e-government projecte e-catalunya by the Catalana Autonomous Government.

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Andrew Seary Andrew Seary is a research associate and consultant at Simon Fraser University. His main research concerns application of methods of mathematical physics to large networks, with emphasis on analysis and visualization based on spectral methods. He has a B.Sc in mathematical physics from McGill University and a Ph.D. from Simon Fraser University, where he developed the MultiNet network analysis program. Recent publications include MultiNet software (richards@sfu.ca) and documentation, "Spectral methods for analyzing and visualizing networks: an introduction." with W. D. Richards and "Networks of Symptoms and Exposures" with W. D. Richards, G. McKeown-Eyssen & C. Baines. The last paper is an example of the application of social network methods to problems in other fields. Seary, in collaboration with Richards and McKeown-Eyssen, has also been applying these methods to problems in cancer epidemiology.

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Munindar Singh Munindar P. Singh, PhD, is a professor in the department of computer science at North Carolina State University. Dr. Munindar's research interests include multiagent systems and service-oriented computing, wherein he addresses the challenges of trust, service selection, and business processes and protocols in large-scale open environments. Munindar has studied adaptive social networks from a computational perspective. At one level, he treats social networks as a basis for knowledge management in groups and organizations. At a deeper level, he treats social networks as a fundamental programming abstraction to support decentralized service selection and trust estimation. In the first, improved infrastructure would enable better mining, management, and exploitation of social networks. In the second, social networks underlie trustworthy use of infrastructure by supporting the dynamic configuration of effective virtual organizations. Munindar is widely published and has over 150 articles to his name. Munindar's books include Multiagent Systems (published by Springer-Verlag in 1994) and the coauthored text, Service-Oriented Computing: Semantics, Processes, Agents (published by Wiley in 2005). Munindar was the editor-in-chief of IEEE Internet Computing from 1999 to 2002 and continues to serve on its editorial board. He is also a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems and the Journal of Web Semantics. He was general cochair of the 2005 edition of the International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems. Munindar's research has been recognized with awards and sponsorship by the National Science Foundation, DARPA, IBM, Cisco Systems, and Ericsson.

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Christian Steglich Christian Steglich works as a postdoc researcher at the ICS research school and the Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences of the University of Groningen. His current research project concerns the stochastic modelling of the co-evolution of social networks and behaviour. His research interests cover theory formation about and formal modelling of (i) individual behaviour and attitudes, (ii) social networks, (iii) social dilemmata, (iv) normative behaviour, and (v) other emergent properties of agent interaction, both for data analytical purposes and for empirically informed simulation studies, and ideally in a dynamic, stochastically challenging context. Other current activities are: (i) Together with Andreas Flache, he hosts the MEMOS research seminar ("Methods and Models in the Social Sciences"), at the sociology department of his university. (ii) Together with Tom Snijders, he is preparing a workshop on the profitable use of the SIENA software. The workshop will take place January 16-20, 2006, in Groningen. (iii) On next year's XVI ISA World Congress of Sociology in Durban, he will host the social network session of the RC33 (Research Committee on Logic and Methodology).

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Kirby Vandivort Kirby Vandivort, a Senior Research Programmer with the Theoretical and Computational Biophysics group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, has been a lead developer on the BioCoRE project since 1999. Since inception of the project he has been directly involved in every aspect of its development including programming, evaluation, and dissemination. Programming duties include creating server infrastructure, producing scripts and scripting interfaces, and structuring dynamic web pages. Prior to working on the BioCoRE project, Kirby taught programming classes as a Teaching Fellow at the University of Missouri-Rolla. Kirby holds an M.S. in Computer Science and a B.S. in Nuclear Engineering.

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Jing Wang Jing (Annie) Wang is a graduate student in the Department of Speech Communication at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has a background in English Literature and Linguistics (B.S.) and Linguistics (M.A.). She is currently a Ph.D. student focusing on Organizational Communication, Social Network Analysis, Multi-agent System Modeling and Complex Systems. She is also a member of the Team Engineering Collaboratory (TECLab) and is currently participating in the National Science Foundation-funded project of IT-Based Collaboration Framework for Preparing against, Responding to, and Recovering from Disasters Involving Critical Physical Infrastructures.

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Stan Wasserman Stan Wasserman, an applied statistician, joined the Departments of Sociology and Psychology at Indiana University in Fall 2004. Formally, he is Rudy Professor of Sociology, Psychology, and Statistics. He also has an appointment in the Karl F. Schuessler Institute for Social Research. Prior to moving to Indiana, he held faculty positions at Carnegie-Mellon University, University of Minnesota, and University of Illinois, in the disciplines of Statistics, Psychology, and Sociology; in addition, at Illinois, he was a part-time faculty member in the Beckman Institute of Advanced Science and Technology, and has had visiting appointments at Columbia University and the University of Melbourne. Wasserman is best known for his work on statistical models for social networks and for his text, co-authored with Katherine Faust, Social Network Analysis: Methods and Applications. His other books have been published by Sage Publications and Cambridge University Press. He has published widely in sociology, psychology, and statistics journals, and has been elected to a variety of leadership positions in the Classification Society of North America and the American Statistical Association. He teaches courses on applied statistics and sociological and psychological methods. He is a fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, and an honorary fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has been an Associate Editor of a variety of statistics and methodological journals (Psychometrika, Journal of the American Statistical Association, Sociological Methodology, to name a few), as well as the Book Review Editor of Chance. His research has been supported over the years by NSF, ONR, and NIMH.. At present, his research is supported by NSF (he is co-PI on the IU Network WorkBench project, and PI for NS06, a workshop/conference on Network Science to be held in Bloomington in May 2006), and ONR (with Doug Steinley, University of Missouri). At present, Wasserman is also Chief Scientist of Visible Path Corporation in New York City, a software firm engaged in developing social network analysis for corporate settings. He is an editor of Centrality.

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Bob Wilhelmson Bob Wilhelmson serves as leader of NCSA's Cyberapplications and Communities Directorate and as the center's chief science officer. He is also a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where his research group models severe weather. Currently he co-leads LEAD, a large National Science Foundation-funded research, integration, and deployment project that is focused on building and adapting advanced cyberinfrastructurer to address important challenges in severe weather research, forecasting, and education. Wilhelmson came to UIUC to do graduate work in 1966. He received his M.S. in 1969 and his Ph.D. in 1972 from the Department of Computer Science. Wilhelmson acted as co-PI for the original unsolicited proposal to the NSF that funded the NSF Supercomputers program in 1986.

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Mengxiao Zhu Mengxiao Zhu is a graduate student in the Department of Speech Communication at University of Illinois, at Urbana-Champaign. She holds degrees in Science and English (B.S.) and Computer Science (B.E. & M.E.). She is currently a Master's student focusing on Organizational Communication, Social Network Analysis, Multi-agent System Modeling and Complex Systems. She is also member of the Team Engineering Collaboratory (TECLab) and is currently participating in the National Science Foundation-funded project of IT-Based Collaboration Framework for Preparing against, Responding to, and Recovering from Disasters Involving Critical Physical Infrastructures.

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